The Child Health Association of Sewickley awards grant of $8,500 helping City High students’ with basic needs

The grant will help all students with basic needs from 2016-2018.

City High has a 68% financial and socially disadvantaged student population, and additionally many of their students are just slightly above the socioeconomic status for vouchers that provide free and reduced lunches or medical help such as eyeglasses. City High saw a need, not only to provide those students with lunches or eyeglasses, but to also help any student struggling with the expectations of attending City High.

City High students’ financial obstacles include having the required professional business attire, daily money for school lunch, and a bus pass if they were deemed a walker, or financial help to attend school field trips. It also included medical expenses such as eyeglasses for students failing the school’s vision screening or providing feminine hygiene products.

Listening to teachers about their students’ struggles, City High decided to look for help beyond core academics. Alesha Council, Keiha Peck and Angela Welch of City High came together to write a grant proposal to the Child Health Association of Sewickley seeking financial help to provide basic needs and the support City High students needed.

grant-writers-cch_2475From L to R: City High Grant writers; Alesha Council—Transition Manager, Angela Welch—Education Manager, and Keiha Peck—Internship Manager.

 

child-health-sewickley

Thanks to the grant from Child Health Association of Sewickley, City High will now be able to give students the support needed so they can reach their fullest potential.

Child Health Association of Sewickley

The Child Health Association of Sewickley is celebrating its 93rd anniversary as an all-volunteer non-profit women’s organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for children in western Pennsylvania. Through charitable giving and volunteer service, Child’s Health’s mission is to nurture the whole child by supporting programs and services that directly address children’s emotional, physical, educational, cultural and recreational needs.

Founded in 1923 by four visionary women to provide milk to undernourished children, nearly 1,400 extraordinary women have expanded that vision through the years and exceed all expectations of what a small group of women can do.

The heart of Child Health today is as it has always been: supporting programs and services for children with real needs and programs to challenge and inspire children to reach their full potential. Early members could do much for children by funding well-baby and dental clinics, public health nurses for schools and community visits, fluoride treatment, polio vaccines, playgrounds, and a pacemaker, a birthing room and a neonatal monitor for the local hospital. Today, Child Health funds some large well-known organizations with established track records; however, it is our ability to help small grass-roots organizations that are addressing the emerging critical needs of the children that sets us apart from large corporate or private philanthropic foundations. After reviewing grant requests, visiting programs and interviewing staff, Child Health typically gives $100,000 annually to qualified organizations working directly with children. Through 2014, over $4 million (not adjusted for inflation) in grants have been awarded.


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